Sunday, November 22, 2020

Fun at the Preserve at Sugar Pine Pt State Park, Tahoma, Lake Tahoe

Tuesday, November 17, 2020

Grant Writers Needed for Save Auburn Ravine Salmon and Steelhead, Inc., headquartered in Auburn, Ca95604. SARSAS.org needs grant writers to fund the many fish passage projects from the Hemphill Dam on Auburn Ravine, two miles upstream on Auburn Ravine from Lincoln, to the City of Auburn, where the Endangered Steelhead and Threatened Salmon will spawn in its two parks, Ashford and Auburn School Park Preserve, between Auburn City Hall and Placer High School in the Center of Auburn. Then, Auburn will be the ONLY city on the the 3,000 miles of Interstate 80 where the occupants of the 120,000 cars passing Auburn each day have the opportunity to stop and see these rare fishes spawn NATURALLY for up to four months each year. SARSAS will share 5% of the total grant awarded with the Grant Writer. For example, if the grant if for one million dollars, the grant gives the writer $50,000. SARSAS will need tens of millions of dollars to get fish to Auburn. Message Jack L. Sanchez is you or someone you know is interested. https://m.facebook.com/watch/?v=1538460926189449&_rdr

SARSAS is Looking for Grant Writers

Grant Writers Needed for Save Auburn Ravine Salmon and Steelhead, Inc., headquartered in Auburn, Ca95604. SARSAS.org needs grant writers to fund the many fish passage projects from the Hemphill Dam on Auburn Ravine, two miles upstream on Auburn Ravine from Lincoln, to the City of Auburn, where the Endangered Steelhead and Threatened Salmon will spawn in its two parks, Ashford and Auburn School Park Preserve, between Auburn City Hall and Placer High School in the Center of Auburn. Then, Auburn will be the ONLY city on the the 3,000 miles of Interstate 80 where the occupants of the 120,000 cars passing Auburn each day have the opportunity to stop and see these rare fishes spawn NATURALLY for up to four months each year. SARSAS will share 5% of the total grant awarded with the Grant Writer. For example, if the grant if for one million dollars, the grant gives the writer $50,000. SARSAS will need tens of millions of dollars to get fish to Auburn. Message Jack L. Sanchez is you or someone you know is interested. https://m.facebook.com/watch/?v=1538460926189449&_rdr

Saturday, September 5, 2020

IMPORTANT NOTICE AND INVITATION From: SAVE AUBURN RAVINE SALMON AND STEELHEED (SARSAS) SAVE THE DATE: Saturday, September 12, 2020 TIME: 10 AM PLACE: Pine Valley Ranch (Christmas Tree Farm) 10680 Kemper Rd. Auburn, CA 95603 Please join us for a walking tour of part of Robert and Sharon Hane’s farm in North Auburn. This tour will “showcase” what SARSAS has accomplished towards fulfilling its mission. During approximately 1-hour with boots on the ground, followed by a brief discussion, you will gain a clear understanding of how SARSAS is working to restore the anadromous Steelhead and Salmon to parts of their historic spawning grounds. The SARSAS goal is to eventually enable local citizens, as well as thousands of visitors to the Auburn environs, to see these remarkable fish in our local streams. Not incidentally, the visitors will certainly contribute thousands of dollars to our local economy as they stay and shop in our community. During your trip to the Hane property you will learn what SARSAS has already accomplished, what remains to be done, and how (if you wish) you can help us fulfill our goals. Join us on September 12. We look forward to seeing you. Please RSVP: Call Jim Ferris (530) 401-1701 or Tom McPherson 878-4503

Friday, February 8, 2019

NATURAL SPAWNING SALMON IN AUBURN RAVINE

https://drive.google.com/file/d/15_llo_oGmEKkBKooKFcWLhgJc899P4ka/view?ts=5bef893f&fbclid=IwAR3xI5jh3TYgLcCb-qpQF3jEhHQjgfstVABOjzLv9OQrxTk4xYXCB8n5vKQ

Tuesday, August 29, 2017

September 25, 2017 Otis Wollan, “Alternatives to Centennial Dam”

September 25, 2017 Otis Wollan, “Alternatives to Centennial Dam” Monday, September 25, 2017 SAVE AUBURN RAVINE SALMON AND STEELHEAD (SARSAS, Inc.) 501C3. Public Benefit Corporation with Employer Identification Number 80-0291680 General Meeting PLACER COUNTY TIGHTENED SECURITY: WHEN ENTERING CEO-1, PLEASE US THE PHONE TO BE BUZZED INTO ROOM AS REQUESTED BY PLACER COUNTY. (OPEN TO THE PUBLIC) 175 Fulweiler Avenue, (the Domes), Auburn, CA 95603 - 10 a. m. Contact: SARSAS President Jack Sanchez at 530-888-0281 or VP Gary Mapa (530 320-9097), who will conduct meetings when Jack’s away. jlsanchez39@gmail.com. Meetings are Fourth Monday of each month at 10-11 a.m. Meetings are held to one hour in length ending at 11 a.m. Please be prompt. I. Self- introductions and sign-ins. II. SARSAS Philosophy – We believe by working together with many individuals and agencies at the same table, we can achieve the mission of SARSAS, which is to return salmon and steelhead to the entire 33 mile length of the Auburn Ravine Speakers are asked to bring their own laptops if possible loaded with their Presentation. III. September 25, 2017 Otis Wollan, “Alternatives to Centennial Dam” Bio: Terrence Otis Wollan Trainer/Facilitator/ Mediator, Organizational Development Consultant, Project Manager President, American River Watershed Institute; Treasurer, Sierra Vista Center 23440 Milk Ranch Road home office/fax 5303467967 PO Box 1750 cell 5303206841 Colfax, CA 957131750 otiswollan@gmail.com Personal: Born April 18, 1948. Married 46 years to Jane Mulder. Three children: Malia 38, Holly 36, Bryanna 34 Otis Wollan has worked for over 25 years as a facilitator, mediator, and trainer in interest based negotiations, organizational effectiveness, and participatory processes. He facilitated the Sacramento River Watershed Program’s Monitoring Committee and OP Pesticide Focus Group, UFSF San Bernardino Mt. Summit on Fire Ecosystem Management, Sacramento Municipal Utility District’s deregulation stakeholder outreach, EPA and California Department of Health Service’s Surface Water Assessment Program, and Santa Clara Valley Water District’s salmon and steelhead restoration project named Fisheries and Habitat Collaboration Effort (FAHCE). He served as the first Coordinator for the American River Watershed Group, and the first coordinator of the Placer County Fire Safe Alliance. He served as Project Manager for the Prop. 13 grant Colfax Community Watershed Health and Fire Safe Ecosystem Project (20032006, www.arwi.us/fire ) and was Project Manager for an EPA grant Sierra Nevada Watershed Climate Change Yield Calculator (20022005, www.arwi.us/climate ). Otis Wollan served for five terms from 1987 to 2008 as elected Director of the Placer County Water Agency, He served for three years on the Board of Directors for the Placer Dispute Resolution Service. He is President of the American River Watershed Institute, and serves as the project manager for the Bear River Awakening project which includes www.SaveBearRiver.com . He served as President and Executive Director of the Climate Neutral Network (19992006). He is Treasurer of the Sierra Vista Center, Inc., and served five years on the Board of Mt. Stream Meditation Center. Otis is a certified Qigong instructor through the ChiCenter, and teaches mindfulness meditation. Otis is Executive Director of Public Officials for Water and Environmental Reform, where he initiated and coordinated the California Assembly Process which has held major statewide stakeholder assemblies on groundwater and CALFED institutional issues, and workshops on desalination and environmental justice; he edited The Power Journal of California Water . POWER sponsored the California Water Policy Conference through its first 20 years. www.cawaterpolicy.org . www.cawaterpolicy.us . Otis served in 2006 as Vice Convenor and in 2007 as Convenor of the California Urban Water Conservation Council (CUWCC). From 1988 to 1993, Otis was the Executive Director of the Committee for Sustainable Agriculture, a not for profit organization dedicated to the development of sustainable agriculture in California. Projects included the Ecological Farming Conference, the publication of a quarterly journal, and a national media event, Organically Grown Week. Earlier projects include: author and publisher of several books on sustainable home design, design and construction of a 65acre community project with integrated passive solar housing and commercial space, design and construction of energy efficient, solar homes. Otis attended Stanford University 196771. Otis lives with his wife at 2000 feet elevation in the Sierra Nevada Bear River Watershed, and is recently completed construction of a new active and passive solar, super insulated, energy efficient and fire safe home on their 18 acres IV. October 23, 2017 – Steve Baker, Operation Unite, “Managing Local Groundwater in the Foothills with a Brief Examination of the Surface Water/Groundwater Interactions” Bio to come There is a solution…make fly fishing invitingly simple to the beginner. Plan”. V. Monday, November 27, 2017 – Burke White, “Touching Nature … in Order to Protect It” Bio: I am a firm believer that exposing people to a valuable outdoor experience is the first step in a long-term plan to save our natural environment. The big challenge is how to inspire the next generation to head outside. Constantly plugged-in to a mobile device and hyper-stimulated with endless data, the average task-oriented millennial is not naturally drawn to beautiful places with limited cell coverage and baristas. The tutors, team-sports and technology of today’s generation are far different from the mentors, mountain camps and matériel of our youth. The times have changed and so must we, if we want to inspire the next generation to explore nature within their comfort zone. We must stop selling “base camp” on Everest and start selling car camp on “Everycrest” by making outside simple, digestible and inviting to all. Only then might we take a small percentage to the next level. It comes down to a task. Ask a child to go hike to the top of a hill and they might ask, “Why?” “Fresh air, exercise and beautiful scenery” might be the adult responses, but none is a task. Ask a child to go fly a kite and you’ve got a kid hiking to the top of a hill in no time. Of course, there are many worthy tasks, but one inspiring task often overlooked is fly fishing. For over twenty-five years, I’ve had the privilege of working in the fly fishing industry. I hope by now I’d be considered an expert in the field. I’ve fished a good part of the world and I’m very intimate with every brand, series and model of product available. However, I’ve come to one important conclusion from my vast fly tour. Most of my experience and knowledge is meaningless to the beginner, and the beginner is the most important customer to a specialty sport and its environment. Ironically, the specialty fly shops, sport-specific magazines and websites are the barriers to entering the sport of fly fishing. It’s near impossible for a fly shop or website to service the avid angler with a vast selection of complex products and information and still flop down a comforting welcome mat for the beginner. Add to this confusion far too many choices and very few (if any) responsible solutions when it comes to gear and most will shy away.Robert Weygandt/Mary Olsway, Invited to talk. VI. Monday, December 18, 2017 – Adam W. Laputz, Assistant Executive Officer, Sacramento Office, “Programs and Tools for Maintaining Healthy watersheds” Adam Laputz has Bachelor's and Master's degrees in Chemical Engineering from the University of Nevada, Reno. Adam is a licensed Professional Engineer with over 14 years of experience working in water quality programs. He has been with the State and Regional Water Boards for over 12 years working in surface water permitting, irrigated lands, water recycling, 401 certification, and waste discharge to land programs. Adam manages the NPDES Point Source Permitting, Irrigated Lands Assessment and Planning, and TMDL Basin Planning sections in the Central Valley Water Board's Sacramento office.dam Lapulz, CVRWQ Control Board, confirmed – topic to follow. VII. January 22, 2018 - Peter Moyle invited to speak VIII. February 22, 2018 – Mike Walker, Roostertails, “Salmon fishing in Canada”, confirmed IX. June 25, 2018 - Dr. Heidi Perryman, “Beavers as Nature’s Helpers” Dr. Perryman formed Worth A Dam to defend the beavers in her home town of Martinez CA. Along the way she became interested in helping other cities learn how and why to co-exist with beavers. Since 2008 she has organized an annual beaver festival that has inspired similar efforts in 5 states and Canada. As California faces more drought years, she believes it is more important than ever to coexist with these important 'water savers'. In addition to the beaver festival, Worth A Dam does several community outreach and education programs a year, including field trips and class room visits. In 2010 they awarded their first scholarship in beaver management to advocates in Tahoe. In 2011 Dr. Perryman presented at the state of the beaver conference in Oregon, and the State parks conference in Yosemite. She collaborated with beaver management expert Michael Callahan of Massachusetts to help release an instructional DVD teaching how to live with beavers (featuring footage of the Martinez Beavers). Most recently she worked with a historian, archaeologist and biologist to publish groundbreaking research on the western fur trade and the original prevalence of beavers in California - a subject that has been surprisingly misunderstood for a nearly a century Beavers and their dams create wetlands, store and filter water, augment fish populations, raise the number of migratory and songbirds, and have a dramatic positive impact on wildlife. Dr. Perryman feels that working to help people understand and coexist with this single species will continue to have a dramatic trickle-down impact on the environment in general. X. March 25, 2019 – Ken Davis - invited - The Power Point will feature the current “Gravelbed Scarification” project being undertaken in Lower Putah Creek to restore salmon and trout spawning areas. The restoration projects are at least contributory, if not responsible for the dramatic increase in the number of spawning Chinook salmon in Lower Putah Creek. The increase from a baseline of essentially zero salmon to more than 1800 Chinooks in the Fall of 2016 can be traced to the beginning of restoration projects. Other opinions on the increased number of spawners will be discussed. The presentation will use underwater video and images to show why Ken believes that mechanical scarification is a major contributor to the dramatic increase in salmon. Bio - Aquatic biologist: Ken Davis has thirty years of experience in designing invasive species survey programs, aquatic invertebrate biology and taxonomy, plankton collection and identification. He is currently the lead biologist on several invasive species survey projects including monitoring New Zealand Mudsnails in Putah Creek and Quagga Mussel surveys in Lake Solano and throughout the Solano Project. He has under contract to develop an innovative project to document the fish of Putah Creek with subsurface video surveillance. That project has been instrumental is capturing video and still images of spawning Chinook salmon in Lower Putah Creek. Ken is currently leading a study to scarify certain sections of Putah Creek to improve salmon spawning areas and enhance the invertebrate population. Wildlife Photojournalist: Ken’s photo career started when he was a triage medic in Viet Nam. During a short medical excursion to Tokyo, he purchased his first 35mm camera. Beginning in 1983, his photos were represented by Tom Stack and Associates an international photo agency. His images have been published in over 4000 different periodicals, encyclopedias, newspapers, and textbooks that include: National Geographic, Wildlife Conservation, Zoobooks, Sports Afield, American Angler, Montana Magazine, and the Flyfisher. Two editors claim that Ken is possibly the premiere aquatic invertebrate photographer in the business. He is the primary owner of Wildlife Survey & Photo Service and Creekman which is a multimedia production company that uses professional photography, video and art for education, documentation and Public Relations arwi.us - Fire Safety Project The threat of wildfire to life, property, and the ecosystems of the Sierra foothills has a major impact on the State of California. This pilot project was developed to address the need for communities to organize and become proactive in fire safety, specifically to reduce the fire fuel load of dense... ARWI.US

Sunday, August 6, 2017

August 28, 2017 –Robert Hane, SARSAS North Ravine Restoration Coordination, “Restoration of North Ravine, Largest Tributary of Auburn Ravine, for Salmon and Steelhead Spawning,” at the Domes, 10am, 175 Fulweiler Ave, Auburn, PC Headquarters Bldg.

August 28, 2017 –Robert Hane, SARSAS North Ravine Restoration Coordination, “Restoration of North Ravine, Largest Tributary of Auburn Ravine, for Salmon and Steelhead Spawning,”